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    • bill
      Top reader of all timeScout
      7 months ago

      Ahhhh. Finally! This is amazing. Fun to read and deeply thought-provoking.

      Very inspiring too. Makes me want to continue to play with literature, words, and all forms of technology for the rest of my life.

      One thing this piece definitely gets right: things are changing fast. And: love. Love is bigger than religion, technology, art, culture, etc. It’s even bigger than truth (!)

    • jeff1 year ago

      Hands down one of the best things I've ever read. There's so much depth and so many layers to this story that I feel like a proper response would have to be an entire article in itself. That said, I think I'm generally pro Remem but I'm not sure exactly how I'd use it.

      We don’t normally think of it as such, but writing is a technology, which means that a literate person is someone whose thought processes are technologically mediated. We became cognitive cyborgs as soon as we became fluent readers, and the consequences of that were profound.

      • Pegeen
        Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
        1 year ago

        SOOOO glad you dug this up from your starred stories! Outrageous!

        • jeff1 year ago

          So glad you read it! I think this will be one of those few great articles that I’ll think about for years to come.

    • Pegeen
      Top reader this weekReading streakScoutScribe
      1 year ago

      One of the most unique stories I have ever read for both it’s content and the way in which it was written. Exceptional. Ted Chiang’s experience was incredibly humiliating and humbling. Certainly had me cringing and glad there are no Remem monitors in my current or past life. I do remember an interview with Marilu Henner, from Taxi. She is someone who has a highly superior autobiographical memory, a rare condition that has been identified in only 100 people worldwide. I recall her saying how difficult it has been to be able to remember every detail of her entire life. She initially called it a curse but I think has managed to live with it.

    • deephdave
      Top reader of all time
      3 years ago

      Gripping story!

      People are made of stories. Our memories are not the impartial accumulation of every second we’ve lived; they’re the narrative that we assembled out of selected moments. Which is why, even when we’ve experienced the same events as other individuals, we never constructed identical narratives: the criteria used for selecting moments were different for each of us, and a reflection of our personalities. Each of us noticed the details that caught our attention and remembered what was important to us, and the narratives we built shaped our personalities in turn.